The Great Einkorn Wheat Experiment

I cannot tell you how much I truly love bread – and anything like unto bread: pizza crusts, rolls, bagels, cookies, doughnuts, funnel cake. MMMMmmmmm! Makes me happy just thinking about it. But then reality hits and I remember: I can’t eat bread. Or wheat. Or anything with gluten for that matter. I really want to eat it. I long for the day when my body will be magically healed and I can eat whatever I want. But until then I’ll tell you what wheat does to me: it makes me sad. In days past, I did not get stomach pains or bowel issues or cramping or any of those things. I just got really… overwhelmingly… sad. Some people call it depression. And for the most part, they’re right. But the word “sad” sums things up quite nicely so that’s my go-to word. Wheat also makes me overwhelmed, irritable, scattered, and not a little cranky to be around. It took me years to figure out the cause of many of my health issues because I had no signs at the source of the problem – just really weird side-effects. I explain this whole ordeal in detail in Broken Vessel Restored, but here I’ll just say: wheat doesn’t like me. So I broke up with wheat and pretended I didn’t care anymore. I was a strong, independent woman who did not need wheat in my life. I could do the gluten-free thing. No problem. But the truth was that because I loved wheat so much I really, really wanted to find a loophole in this whole mess. So I researched all about...

The Fourth Pillar of Health: The Absence of Loneliness

The first three pillars of health give us plenty to think about. We could focus on Nutrition, Toxin Removal, and Stress Management for years. But the fourth pillar of health is so very important that it can sometimes dwarf the other three. In fact, having this pillar strongly anchored in your life can compensate for the first three pillars being rather weak. Conversely, the lack of the fourth can make the first three pillars all the more critical. The fourth pillar of health is the most overlooked by far. This fourth pillar is: the sense of belonging you have when you feel connected to others. It is the sense of community that occurs when you know your neighbors and have close friends and/or family nearby. It is the feeling that you matter in life. And it is CRUCIAL to good health. The other day I noticed a blog post by a good friend of mine titled, “Are you Lonely? You’re Not the Only One.” I read it immediately knowing my next post would be on that very topic. As I read Mrs. Green’s blog, I couldn’t help but have memories flood back of my most painful, lonely years and doing almost everything she did during her own lonely times. You must read it. It so elegantly summarizes what I would like to say: Click here to read “Are You Lonely?…” How many women have gone shopping just to interact with another human being? How many people feel like they need to get OUT THERE more and make some new friends? How many of you have ever silently wished that you had...

The Third Pillar of Health: Beating Stress

In August, I wrote separate posts about the first two pillars of health: Nutrition and Toxin Removal. Now that kids are back in school (whew!), let’s talk about the next pillar of good health: Stress Management. Stress is on the rise for many, but I would venture that this is especially true for women. Child-bearing, motherhood, careers, home care, volunteer work, and financial concerns all add to our stress levels and chip away at our health and mental reserves. The beginning of the school year is a great example of how stress creeps into our lives. During the summer months while trying to keep children from boredom and assault, I try to eliminate all lessons and most appointments. I do this so our calendars can be free to go on trips and wander through our days without any need to rush to be somewhere else. My favorite days are the ones that have nothing, zero, zip, nada on the calendar. When I see a day like that, my heart sings. I know I can be blissfully unstructured for a whole day. Once school starts however, that all changes. There are no empty days. Kid’s school drop-off and pick-up, extra-curriculars and doctor appointments, along with my work tasks and house responsibilities (why does something always need fixing that requires a four-hour waiting period?) mean that stress creeps in faster and faster each new school year. For those of you who work full-time, I know that an empty day is about as rare as a unicorn sighting. If you do get a day off of work, you usually have to cram...